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About Film & Animation / Hobbyist Member Richard SvenssonMale/Sweden Recent Activity
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Loneanimator
Richard Svensson
Artist | Hobbyist | Film & Animation
Sweden
Current Residence: Sweden
Favourite genre of music: Rock, Folk rock, progressive rock.
Favourite style of art: Black and white ink drawings.
Favourite cartoon character: Calvin & Hobbes
Personal Quote: The more you do, the more you get to do (Tom Savini).
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:iconloneanimator:
Loneanimator Featured By Owner 4 days ago  Hobbyist Filmographer
That was a lot of fun! :)
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:iconrexarkingdino:
Rexarkingdino Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Do you ever plan on making stop motion interpretations of the Five Nights at Freddy's animatronics?
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:iconloneanimator:
Loneanimator Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2014  Hobbyist Filmographer
Nope! :)
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:iconrexarkingdino:
Rexarkingdino Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Darn, oh well xD 
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:iconbrian-oconnell:
Brian-OConnell Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Have you read "Canon Alberic's Scrapbook" by M.R. James? Excuse me if you have, but I think you would find plenty to illustrate in that frightening tale, or even animate. Let me pick a few leafs...

"What he then saw impressed him, as he has often told me, more than he could have conceived any drawing or picture capable of impressing him. And, though the drawing he saw is no longer in existence, there is a photograph of it (which I possess) which fully bears out that statement. The picture in question was a sepia drawing at the end of the seventeenth century, representing, one would say at first sight, a Biblical scene; for the architecture (the picture represented an interior) and the figures had that semi-classical flavour about them which the artists of two hundred years ago thought appropriate to illustrations of the Bible. On the right was a king on his throne, the throne elevated on twelve steps, a canopy overhead, soldiers on either side — evidently King Solomon. He was bending forward with outstretched sceptre, in attitude of command; his face expressed horror and disgust, yet there was in it also the mark of imperious command and confident power. The left half of the picture was the strangest, however. The interest plainly centered there. On the pavement before the throne were grouped four soldiers, surrounding a crouching figure which must be described in a moment. A fifth soldier lay dead on the pavement, his neck distorted, and his eyeballs starting from his head. The four surrounding guards were looking at the King. In their faces the sentiment of horror was intensified; they seemed, in fact, only restrained from flight by their implicit trust in their master. All this terror was plainly excited by the being that crouched in their midst. I entirely despair of conveying by any words the impression which this figure makes upon anyone who looks at it. I recollect once showing the photograph of the drawing to a lecturer on morphology — a person of, I was going to say, abnormally sane and unimaginative habits of mind. He absolutely refused to be alone for the rest of the evening, and he told me afterwards that for many nights he had not dared to put out his light before going to sleep. However, the main traits of the figure I can at least indicate. At first you saw only a mass of coarse, matted black hair; presently it was seen that this covered a body of fearful thinness, almost a skeleton, but with the muscles standing out like wires. The hands were of a dusky pallor, covered, like the body, with long, coarse hairs, and hideously taloned. The eyes, touched in with a burning yellow, had intensely black pupils, and were fixed upon the throned King with a look of beast-like hate. Imagine one of the awful bird-catching spiders of South America translated into human form, and endowed with intelligence just less than human, and you will have some faint conception of the terror inspired by those to whom I have shown the picture. 'It was drawn from the life.'"

"In another infinitesimal flash he had taken it in. Pale, dusky skin, covering nothing but bones and tendons of appalling strength; coarse black hairs, longer than ever grew on a human hand; nails rising from the ends of the fingers and curving sharply down and forward, grey, horny, and wrinkled.

"He flew out of his chair with deadly, inconceivable terror clutching at his heart. The shape, whose left hand rested on the table, was rising to a standing posture behind his seat, its right hand crooked above his scalp. There was black and tattered drapery about it; the coarse hair covered it as in the drawing. The lower jaw was thin — what can I call it? — shallow, like a beast's; teeth showed behind the black lips; there was no nose; the eyes, of a fiery yellow, against which they pupils showed black and intense, and the exulting hate and thirst to destroy life which shone there, were the most horrifying features in the whole vision. There was intelligence of a kind in them — intelligence beyond that of a beast, below that of a man."

gaslight.mtroyal.ab.ca/jamesX0…

I hope you'll read it. The two passages quoted have a great illustratable potential, am I right? If you decide to go for an illustration, I'll wait! If you go for a puppet, I'm in!
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:iconloneanimator:
Loneanimator Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2014  Hobbyist Filmographer
Yep, I have read it, and some years ago I was planning to film my own version using a muppet representation of the demon, rather than an animated puppet. It never materialized, thogh. I might still give it a go one day.
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:iconbrian-oconnell:
Brian-OConnell Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Well, if it ever does come from the page to hideous life in film, then let me know if there's any way I can help...
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:iconrexarkingdino:
Rexarkingdino Featured By Owner Jun 26, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
I just discovered you last night on Youtube, your stop motion is so amazing! o: How long does it take you to finish just one sculpture alone?
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:iconloneanimator:
Loneanimator Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2014  Hobbyist Filmographer
Thanks! Glad you like my stop-mo; it's a very big and important part of my creativity.
By sculpture, do you mean puppet? A puppet takes from about three days to over a week to finish, if I'm working on nothing else. The sculptures in clay that form the basis for each puppet takes about an evening (3-6 hours).
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